Mohawk Chief Joseph Brant, an ardent Loyalist, led Six Nations warriors into battle on the side of the British during the American Revolutionary War. Recognizing the great service Brant had rendered unto the Crown during the conflict, the British allowed him a choice of land for his own use. Brant chose a tract of land containing 3450 acres on which the present day city of Burlington, Ontario is located.

Governor Simcoe of Upper Canada gave instructions that the land chosen by Brant was to be purchased from the Mississaugas of the Credit by the Crown and then granted to Joseph Brant. In October 1795, a provisional agreement was reached wherein the Mississaugas sold the land for £100. The purchase agreement was confirmed in 1797.

In 1988, the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation initiated a claim against the Government of Canada alleging that the Crown had paid less than originally promised when purchasing the Brant Tract. The claim was settled in conjunction with the Toronto Purchase Claim, in 2010, for a sum of $145 million.

Ajetance Treaty, No. 19 (1818)

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The Ajetance Purchase (Treaty 19) was signed with the Mississaugas of the Credit in 1818 and includes Brampton and Milton.

Head of the Lake, Treaty No. 14 (1806)

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A day after the Toronto Purchase agreement was reached in 1805, the Mississaugas of the Credit were asked to sell lands immediately west of the lands they had ceded the day before. A provisional [...]

The Toronto Purchase Treaty No. 13 (1805)

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  The Crown, in the 1780s, recognized the need to secure communication and supply lines to their western outposts and to unite the settlements along Lake Ontario from Kingston to Niagara. In order to [...]

Mississaugas Treaty at Niagara (1781)

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  The American Revolution (1775-1783) compelled the British Crown to search for secure transportation and communication lines to its western garrisons as well as for ways to provision them. Observing that the west bank [...]